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golang

Interface Pollution in Golang

Interfaces are one of the cornerstones of the Go language when designing and structuring our code. However, like many tools or concepts, abusing them is generally not a good idea. Interface pollution is about overwhelming our code with unnecessary abstractions, making it harder to understand. So, first we understand the concept of interface and then…

Not being aware of the possible problem of type embedding

Concept of embedded field A struct field without a name is known as embedded field. For example :- In the Employee struct, the Address type is declared without an associated name; hence, it’s an embedded field. But this can sometimes lead to unexpected behaviors if we don’t understand all the implications of type embedding. Note…

Being confused about when to use generics

Introduction The Go 1.18 release introduced a new feature called generic types (commonly known by the shorter term, generics). This allows writing code with types that can be specified later and instantiated when needed. However, it can be confusing about when to use generics and when not to. In this blog, I will try to describe the concept…

Project misorganization

Project organization is one of the most common mistake made by Go Developer. Go provides a lots of freedom for designing the packages and modules hence it is not easy task to organize the project. is The purpose of organizing the project are maintainability, readability, consistency and so on.

Any says nothing

The interface type that specifies zero methods is known as the empty interface: interface{} An empty interface may hold values of any type. (Every type implements at least zero methods.) Empty interfaces are used by code that handles values of unknown type. With Go 1.18 the predeclared type any became an alias for an empty…

Comparing values incorrectly

Comparing values incorrectly

In software development comparing values between fields is a common operation. Writing a function to compare two objects, and testing to compare a value to the expected result are some of the frequently implemented comparisons. While comparing our first insight might be to use the == operator everywhere. But this should not always be the…

Not understanding slices length and capacity

Slice is a variable-length sequence which stores elements of a similar type, you are not allowed to store different type of elements in the same slice. It is just like an array having an index value and length, but the size of a slice is resized they are not in fixed-sized just like an array….

Never using named result paramater

In Go return or result parameters can have a named parameter. Having a named parameter eliminates the necessity of having a variable name along with a return parameter as the user can only use a return keyboard to return the result. When a result parameter is named, it’s initialized to its zero value when the…

Using a filename as a function input

While creating a new function that reads the file, passing the filename as an argument is not considered best practice and might have negative effects such as making it difficult to write test cases for a variety of criteria. Suppose we want to implement a function to count the number of empty lines in a…

Ignoring how defer arguments are evaluated

In order to understand how arguments are processed using the defer keyword, let’s consider a specific example. Suppose we have a function that needs to execute two other functions, called foo and bar. Additionally, this function needs to handle some status information related to its execution. We can use the defer keyword to ensure that…

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